Final Cut Pro 10.3.2 Visit Site

Final Cut Pro X is Apple's signature professional video editing software, continuing Apple's tradition of industry-standard applications. It is intuitive enough for new users to grasp while providing the expansive tool array demanded by veteran and pro video editors. If you're a Mac user and a video editor, Final Cut Pro X was made with you in mind and will fit almost any need you have.

The first thing you notice about Final Cut Pro X is how great it looks. In true Apple fashion, this program is a pleasure to look at. This is a stark contrast to the often-drab interfaces of the competition. While aesthetics don't always translate into increased functionality, in Apple's case they almost always do. Final Cut Pro X is no exception. The software is quite intuitive and full of features – it would be impossible to detail all the tools in this application, but rest assured that if you're a professional video editor, you can find what you need here.

One of the most innovative parts of Final Cut Pro X is how you get all your media elements into the program. All the importing and capturing functionality is consolidated into a single panel. This means that no matter your footage source, whether it be a flash drive, memory card, DSLR camera or network location, Final Cut Pro has a single spot that does it all. And it's pretty simple to use. The filmstrip provides an at-a-glance view of all your footage, and the media browser can help you find any file you need to import. You also have the option to set favorite locations in the sidebar for your frequently used media sources.

One of the major features Apple includes in this professional video editing software is the innovative magnetic timeline. This new take on the old concept of the timeline makes it easier to compose your project because it automatically snaps the clips into place. It also adjusts clips automatically as you move clips around on the timeline. This is great because it reduces the time you spend adjusting sequences by moving one clip at a time whenever you need to insert something new.

Another innovative feature is the ability to create compound clips. Simply put, compound clips are sequences that the application treats as a single unit. The advantage of compound clips is that you can move sequences as a single piece rather than one at a time. Before this, it was a two- or three-step process to move complicated sequences around, and once you got it just the way you wanted it, moving it piecemeal would disrupt the sequence and you couldn't always get it back. Compound clips eliminate this problem nicely.

There is very little to complain about with Final Cut Pro X. It is not only pleasing to the eye but also incredibly useful, providing editing tools that only a few years ago were unthinkable. The only thing that would keep you from buying it is the fact that it’s only available on Mac.