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AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 Review

The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 is one of the newest glucometers on the market to feature Bluetooth, which it uses to sync your data with the AgaMatrix Diabetes Manager app. As with older AgaMatrix meters, the Jazz Wireless 2 uses strips that feature its WaveSense technology.

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The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 comes with a small carrying case and lancing device.

The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 comes with a small carrying case and lancing device.
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The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2’s carrying case uses elastic straps to hold the lancing device, the meter and the test strips.

The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2’s carrying case uses elastic straps to hold the lancing device, the meter and the test strips.
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It’s difficult to access and replace the AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2’s rechargeable battery.

It’s difficult to access and replace the AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2’s rechargeable battery.
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The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 is one of the smallest glucometers on the market.

The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 is one of the smallest glucometers on the market.
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The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 uses Bluetooth to sync your readings to a smartphone app for easy data management.

The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 uses Bluetooth to sync your readings to a smartphone app for easy data management.
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The display on the AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 is very small, and it isn't high-contrast, which makes it more difficult to read than other meters’ screens.

The display on the AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 is very small, and it isn't high-contrast, which makes it more difficult to read than other meters’ screens.

The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 is one of the newest glucometers on the market to feature Bluetooth, which it uses to sync your data with the AgaMatrix Diabetes Manager app. As with older AgaMatrix meters, the Jazz Wireless 2 uses strips that feature its WaveSense technology. The company claims WaveSense provides the most accurate readings on the market by using Dynamic Electrochemistry with proprietary enzymes and algorithms designed to correct common errors.

I tested the 11 glucometers I reviewed multiple times a day to gauge how accurate they were on a small scale. In these tests, the Jazz Wireless 2 received an A-, which means it was within the acceptable range more than most meters. To find this range, I averaged the 11 readings during each session. I then set the minimum acceptable limit at 15 percent below the average and the maximum at 15 percent above it. Any readings that fell outside that range were deemed likely inaccurate.

That said, our tests weren't based on true glucose levels, which are found using medical lab tests. We based our test on the assumption that the true glucose level would most likely be closer to the average reading than otherwise and that any readings outside the acceptable range were outliers. However, keep in mind that the FDA has strict accuracy requirements for glucometers sold in the U.S., and all the ones available for purchase have proven to provide readings within 15 percent of the actual glucose level, 95 percent of the time.

The Jazz Wireless 2’s biggest drawback is the availability of its test strips. Older AgaMatrix test strips are widely available and very affordable, but these older-style strips, used by the company’s Presto meters, aren't compatible with the Jazz Wireless 2. When I ran out of strips during testing, I found that not many online retailers carry them, and most of the ones that did were out of stock. When I found some in stock, the shipping fee to get them to me overnight was double the cost of the strips.

On a positive note, the strips cost less than average – the Jazz Wireless 2 received a B grade for affordability because each test strip only costs about 45 cents. This makes them considerably more affordable than those used by glucometers made by big brands like the Accu-Chek Aviva and OneTouch Verio, both of which use strips that cost over $1 each. (This evaluation didn't take insurance coverage into account. Your insurance could lower the cost of the strips considerably.)

Another minor downside to the Jazz Wireless 2 is its small display. It's so small that it may be difficult to read if you have vision problems as a result of your diabetes, even with the high-contrast numbers.

That said, the glucometer’s main feature is its Bluetooth, which wirelessly syncs your data to the AgaMatrix Diabetes Manager app on your smartphone. Ideally, you'd use the meter only to measure your blood, and you'd use the app as the interface for reading your glucose levels and keeping notes about your diet and health. This mitigates the problems that come with having a tiny display.

AgaMatrix Diabetes Manager is an excellent app for managing your diabetes, though it's not much different than many diabetes management systems. It graphs your readings over time so you can see trends in your health and make appropriate changes. It also lets you share your data with your physician and has an inbox for communication purposes.

The AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 is among the best glucometers on the market because it is accurate and easy to sync to its companion diabetes manager app. However, while the test strips are more affordable than most on the market, they aren't as easy to get a hold of, which could be an issue if you run out before your refills arrives.

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