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DxO PhotoLab Elite Edition Review

Editor's Note: DxO PhotoLab Elite Edition 2 is now available. Clicking the Buy button will take you to this version for purchase. We will evaluate, rank and review the new version when we next update the Mac Photo Editing Software reviews.

Our Verdict

This software offers a handful of powerful editing tools but not enough to warrant the high cost.

For

  • This software gives you a lot of control during the editing process.

Against

  • It’s very expensive.
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Editor's Note: DxO PhotoLab Elite Edition 2 is now available. Clicking the Buy button will take you to this version for purchase. We will evaluate, rank and review the new version when we next update the Mac Photo Editing Software reviews. Meanwhile, enjoy our review below about DxO PhotoLab Elite Edition.

This program is relatively easy to use and offers a good amount of powerful editing tools, however, it costs more than twice as much as most of the other software we tested. Frankly, we can't see a reason why it should sell for so much considering you can get these tools with a cheaper program.

DxO sells this software for $129.99, which is much more than any of the other photo editing programs we tested. The software itself is very easy to use and offers some really good tools but they aren't good enough to warrant the cost. You can periodically find this program selling cheaper on Amazon, when it is in stock. That would be the best buying option if you're set on using this program. To make sure it's something that would work well for you, you might want to try the free 31-day trial first.

PhotoLab has a well-designed interface that you can easily navigate. There are a decent set of tools covering red eye removal, cropping, healing brushes and color adjustments. However, this software was missing many of the tools we found in other programs. Namely, background removal, object removal, a panorama guide, an HDR guide and more. If you want software that offers more editing tools, consider Adobe Photoshop Elements.

We did find the Local Adjustments feature to be especially nice as it allows you to select a section of your photo and quickly adjust the contrast, hue and exposure. It gives you a lot of control when adjusting you image. We were altogether impressed by the results of the included editing tools, but we still couldn't get over the high cost of the software as it is missing some essential editing tools.

EXIF metadata is readily shown in the Customization tab so you can see what settings your camera was set to when you took your favorite photos. Additionally, a folder filled with 37 presets will help you make quick adjustments or add flair to your images. This software has an organizing system that allows you to add star ratings to your images or use one of two color labels. You can search for your images by file name, creation date, rank, format and size. However, you cannot add keyword tags or face tags.

When you are done manipulating your photos, you can export them onto a disk or share directly to Facebook, Facebook Messenger, Twitter, Flickr or email. This software has limited file compatibility, working namely with RAW, JPG and TIFF files.

DxO offers plenty of video tutorials and a FAQs page to help you find answers to questions. You can also interact with other users on the forum to learn tricks and exchange tips. If you need to contact customer support, both a phone number and email are available to you, but there is no live chat option.

PhotoLab is an expensive piece of software that gives you an easy way to sort and categorize your photos, but it doesn't offer as many editing tools as other programs we tested. While the tools it does offer do allow you to have better control over the editing process, we don't think it's worth the cost when you could get similar results from cheaper programs.