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Tutor.com is a 24/7 tutoring service available in the U.S. and Canada. The site has a lot of the scheduling features we looked for, but its interface is almost too simple. There isn’t a lot of information on the homepage, so we had to click around a bit to find what we were looking for.

The service pairs you with a tutor in just a few minutes after you fill in the text box on its homepage with details about your assignment and school subject. I didn’t like that I couldn’t review the tutor’s profile before I connected with them and the session began. There is another place on the site where you can browse through profiles and schedule a session with a specific tutor. However, Chegg, one of the service’s competitors, gets you help within minutes and also lets you choose the tutor you think will best suit your needs.

I also wasn’t impressed with the online tutoring suite. The voice and video options aren’t easy to find on the screen, and the platform isn’t quite as sophisticated as those in my favorite online tutoring programs. It also doesn’t have quality graphing tools, and while you can upload files to share with your tutor, the settings aren’t as customizable or easy to find as in the best tutoring services’ suites.

You can purchase one-, two-, three-, five- or 10-hour plans on Tutor.com. The price comes out to about 66 cents per minute, though the more hours you purchase, the cheaper the price per minute. Both Chegg and TutorMe offer lower prices.

I enjoyed using pay-as-you-go options on other sites – they are convenient because you don’t have to spend a lot of money upfront or buy more time than you need. But it’s also true that a productive session with a tutor can take several hours, so purchasing a package isn’t always a problem. However, it would be nice if Tutor.com had plans in smaller chunks of time for quick help with editing or a single math problem.

Tutor.com’s standards for hiring are similar to those of other online tutoring sites – it mostly recruits college students with flexible work schedules. The employees must be at least sophomores and enrolled in or graduated from an accredited academic institution, and the site has additional degree requirements for tutors who want to help with upper-level math and science. On the tutor’s profiles, you can see reviews from other users as well as accreditations and certifications, which can be helpful as you decide which person you’d like to work with. There are a few free resources on the site, but not much else. Tutor.com would be a better option if the interface was a little more developed and there was easy-to-find contact information and a FAQs section on the homepage.

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