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Harmar Alpine II RP350 Stair Lift Review

Editor’s Note: This product has been removed from our side-by-side comparison because it has been discontinued.

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The Alpline stairlift comes in standard and signature models.

The Alpline stairlift comes in standard and signature models.
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To avoid damage, the Alpine II is attached to the stairs, rather than the walls.

To avoid damage, the Alpine II is attached to the stairs, rather than the walls.
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The Harmar Alpine II stairlift has a maximum weight capacity of 300 pounds.

The Harmar Alpine II stairlift has a maximum weight capacity of 300 pounds.
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The Alpine II starts and stops gently.

The Alpine II starts and stops gently.

Editor’s Note: This product has been removed from our side-by-side comparison because it has been discontinued. You can still read our original review below, but Top Ten Reviews is no longer updating this product’s information.

The Harmar Alpine II RP350 is a straight stairlift and an improvement over the first Alpine stairlift. The Alpine II has a longer rail and a premounted track section that makes installation easier and faster. In addition, the new Alpine stairlift has better upholstery and solves the overrun issues common with the old Alpine stairlift.

Besides the standard Alpine II stairlift, Harmar offers a classier variant known as the Alpine II Signature Stair lift or RP350S. Both stairlifts have the same features, but the RP350S has a larger ergonomic seat, foldable arms and more stylish upholstery. The standard and signature Alpine stairway lift uses a rack-and-pinion drive system, has rails made of extruded aluminum, and achieves a speed of 19 feet per minute while running on AC or the included 24-volt DC battery.

Although the battery in the Alpine II stairlift keeps the carriage going during power outages, it can only power 10 to 20 return trips even when fully charged. This is adequate for most homes, but for heavy users who live in areas where power outages are common or prolonged, the Alpine II is limited. The 300-pound maximum weight capacity of this stairlift is low for a handicap stairlift.

For those under the maximum weight limit, the Alpine II is a sturdy and safe stairlift, though it's not as heavy-duty as the Harmar Pinnacle. It runs quietly, starts softly and stops gently. The unit comes with two wireless remote controls. These call or send the stairlift up or down the stairs. To prevent damage to the stairlift and injury to the rider, Harmar built a number of safety features into the RP350 and RP350S. These include a seat belt, a key switch, obstruction sensors in the footrest, a final limit switch, a seat swivel cutoff and a pressure monitor.

To avoid damage to your home, the Alpine II mounts on the stairs and not on walls. However, its premounted track section means that there is no way to adapt the RP350 into a curved stairlift. You'd have to consider a stairlift like the Acorn 180 instead. The RP350S offers very little over the standard model. Its foldable arms are a standard feature on most stair elevators, and its large seat and classy upholstery should be options for the standard model rather than features of a different model.

The Alpine II is not the most attractive or full-featured stair elevator on the market, but its three-year warranty on parts and one-year warranty on battery means that it costs less to maintain and repair than many stairlifts.