Skip to main content

Best typing software 2021

Best typing software 2021
(Image credit: Typesy)

The world is a fast-moving place and your computer literacy is more important than ever. Whether you’re looking to brush up on your typing skills or you need a new typing software to help students navigate their keyboards, we’ve compiled a list of the best typing software for 2021, where you’ll find everything you need to develop your type skills.

You’ll find that many of the software packages or apps included on this list has either a free online platform, or comes with a free trial, so there no excuse to not give it a shot. The skills you’ll learn don’t just stop at typing, but a great range of lessons in computer literacy and applying type skills elsewhere. You’ll become proficient in touch typing, so you’ll never need to glance down again. Hand placements so the one finger type will become a thing of the past. And, key shortcuts, so you can show off every tip and trick.

If you’re here to help kids get to grips with their first keyboards, then there are loads of child friendly interfaces perfect for younger learners, but we do also have a guide to the best typing software for kids too. Teachers can have full autonomy on so many of our best typing software options, not to mention kids will be entertained with excellent games and activities that will get everyone learning type skills without even realising it.

If you need to round out your computer literacy, we also have a guide to the best online grammar checkers, and a look at the best resume writing software.


1. Typesy: Best typing software overall 

Typesy

(Image credit: Typesy)

Typesy

Our top overall pick, thanks to its great value, range of courses, and ease of use

Fun and easy to use
A broad range of lessons
Good value, especially for schools
Interface is a little outdated
Customer service could be better

We’ve listed Typesy as our best overall typing software 2021, and it’s not difficult to see why. Typesy has one of the largest range of lessons you’ll find on this list - 77 in total -  and they cover a range of topics from touch typing, to management skills. You’ll be able to truly diversify your computer skills with Typesy’s help. The interface is clean, kid friendly, and created by experts, so if you’re teaching you can feel safe that the information has been collected by those in the know. All the typing progress is saved, and suggests your next class by how well you’re doing, tailoring your experience.

Starting at under $10 a month the subscription costs won’t break the bank, and as each download can be shared by up to five people, you’re getting a great rate for a comprehensive, and sharable platform.


2. Typing.com: Best free typing software

Typing.com

(Image credit: Typing.com)

Typing.com

If you want something simple, and free, this is a good choice

Good free option
Great for younger users
Easy to use
Best stuff is paid-for
Can't track progress without membership

Typing.com is by far the best free resource out there for typing software. The platform has a wonderful range of free pages that are perfect for adults and kids. As the name suggests Typing.com is a website so there’s no need to download any software onto your device. It also means that your lessons are available anywhere at any time, simply login and you’re learning again. All you need to use Typing.com is a Google account, so you can access Google Classroom, but don’t worry Google accounts are free too, and easy to set up.

Typing.com does have a paid for section to the site, if you’re a teacher with a large class, or a home schooler with a student or two, there are bespoke membership options that will suit you. With Typing.com you’ll have the option to add one student for one year, up to 9999 students for ten years, and every number in between. The premium version of the site gives you more games and activities, as well as more tracking options for teachers. If you don’t want to sign up right away then the free account won’t end, and it has enough tools that you’ll get a great typing education anyway.


3. KeyBlaze Typing Tutor: Best for adults

KeyBlaze Typing Tutor

(Image credit: KeyBlaze Typing Tutor)

KeyBlaze Typing Tutor

If you want to learn typing for a profession, KeyBlaze is a good resource

Download for free
Has 10 key typing lessons
Looks very dated
Limited support options

KeyBlaze isn’t for everyone: it’s definitely a package aimed at professionals, even if it looks very dated. The interface has a distinct 90’s look to the click and point dialogue boxes, but it makes sure that you’re practicing the best skills for the workplace. KayBlaze offers a little something extra than other typing software on this list – with 10 key support you’ll also learn how to integrate the numbered side of a larger keyboard into your touch type skills.

KeyBlaze is free to download, and should you decide to go premium then you’ll have access to loads more content, as well as the business-friendly version coming with a commercial licence. The company that has made KeyBlaze also offers a range of other software that you can add to your package. For a range of prices, you can also download image and video software. If you’re a professional looking for a solid choice of software, then look no further.


4. Typing Instructor Platinum: Most entertaining software

Typing Instructor

(Image credit: Typing Instructor)

Typing Instructor Platinum

Typing Instructor Platinum puts the fun of learning at the forefront, and you’ll enjoy whatever level of lesson you take

Fun range of games and activities
Suitable for beginners, intermediate, and experienced typists
No free options
Cheapest option only gives 7-days access

The world of typing software isn’t always the most fun filled. Typing Instructor Platinum changes all of that by giving users a huge range of diverse games and activities to engage with. You’ll find yourself taken all over the world with country specific games, that you’ll have online access to 24/7/365! TIP describes all of the games on offer as its arcade, and like an arcade you’ll be rushing from place to place, as their interface is easy to navigate.

With multiple typing plans on offer TIP caters to loads of different skill sets, and if you’re using the programme as a beginner then you’ll be able to follow it through until you’re a verified expert. Each game has multiple levels and as you complete and progress across the site, you’ll be given your own certificates to show off just how far you’ve come. With no software to download onto your PC the site is completely online, saving you previous memory. Just like Typing.com this online website means that you can login on the go, without needed to drag a device around with you. The site will save your progress and you can pick up where you left off.


5. Ultrakey: Best for beginners

UltraKey

(Image credit: UltraKey)

Ultrakey

A fun and welcome experience that takes users from strength to strength

Great for beginners
Available on Amazon
No free options
Looks very out of date

Ultrakey claims that it can help you to become a master typist in just two weeks. The software has a broad range and hopes to be of use for beginners and experts alike. The company recognises the important for computer literacy and type skills in the modern workplace and has created a software that caters to people building these skillsets. The programme is compatible with most versions of windows and is currently available to purchase both on their website and through Amazon, making it a convenient purchase.

Put in the skill level you want to achieve and Ultrakey will create a learning path to get yourself to that goal. Reviews of UIltakey show a huge range of users who are happy with the product. Ranging from parents who bought the software for their children (under 10), to college students, and even administrative professionals who have improved their work skills through Ultrakey.

Whilst the interface is colorful and interesting, it’s a little dated and relies on a clunky hand animation to show where to place your fingers on the keyboard. Given that the programme is for beginners the animation style fits. If you’re already familiar with some type skills, then there are more inclusive options out there for you. 


How much does typing software cost?

Some of the best typing programs are free, though their reporting features are usually limited unless you create an account. Still, their activities can help you improve your speed with practice. You can also purchase and download programs, usually for less than $50. These for-pay applications usually provide more specific recommendations for improvement in their reports. Nowadays, many programs are offered as subscriptions. We recommend choosing a subscription software because you only need to pay for it as long as you need it, which keeps costs low. 

What is important when shopping for typing software?

Ease of use
It can be stressful mastering a new skill. While you’re learning, you don’t need the added stress of dealing with a less-than-intuitive interface, so it’s crucial to find a typing program with a simple, clear-cut layout. We found that the best programs have a clean, modern interface that is well organized, with tabs, buttons and other functions clearly labeled. You should be able to find lessons, quizzes, games and reports quickly, and mid-lesson instructions should be clear and easy to follow.

Occupation-relevant content
Being able to type quickly and accurately makes you more valuable in the workforce and looks great on your resume. Knowing how to use all parts of the keyboard, including the number and symbol keys, can help you type more efficiently while you’re at work. It also makes search engine  and social media use go a little more smoothly, as well.

Most beginner and intermediate courses don’t let you practice with the types of content the average adult would encounter in a professional setting, but Typesy and KeyBlaze both have exercises that can teach you how to type materials such as legal documents and marketing content, and they even have 10-key exercises to improve your data entry skills.

Alternative keyboards
The vast majority of people learn to type on the standard English  QWERTY keyboard. However, there are a few alternatives out there that claim to be more ergonomic or efficient. Type Fu and Master Key both include lessons for the Dvorak keyboard layout, which is the second most popular type of English keyboard.

Licensing & installs
If you plan to use your typing software on a single computer, there’s no need to stress over licences and installs. However, if you think you may need to use it on multiple computers, double check that the program you want to purchase allows for that. Some offer two or three installs with a single license, while others lock it down to one. A few have no limitations, allowing you to access the program as you please. Bulk licenses for schools or businesses may also be available at a discount if you talk with the manufacturer.

Help & Support
Learning to type is relatively straightforward, but sometimes the program you are using may not be. And should you have a question or concern, it’s nice to know that there are tutorials, FAQs and other helpful resources available to you whenever you need them. All of the programs we tested supply email and phone support, and most of them have informational resources right on their websites.