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Miele C1 Olympus Review

Editor’s Note: This product has been removed from our side-by-side comparison because it has been discontinued.

Our Verdict

The Miele C1 Olympus is a compact canister vacuum that doesn't require a lot of room in your closet, but its design sacrifices a lot of cleaning and suction power.

For

  • This is the lightest vacuum in the lineup at only 10 pounds.

Against

  • It isn't bagless, and the cost of bags and filters for it is the highest of all the canister vacuums we tested.
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The head of the Miele C1 Olympus is designed to work on carpet and not scratch up hardwood.

The head of the Miele C1 Olympus is designed to work on carpet and not scratch up hardwood.
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The C1 Olympus' bin is large, but it uses smaller wheels than other canister vacuums, which makes it harder to maneuver.

The C1 Olympus' bin is large, but it uses smaller wheels than other canister vacuums, which makes it harder to maneuver.
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The Olympus requires replacement bags instead of a reusable bin.

The Olympus requires replacement bags instead of a reusable bin.
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The C1 Olympus has an attachment for cleaning upholstery or curtains in your home.

The C1 Olympus has an attachment for cleaning upholstery or curtains in your home.

Editor’s Note: This product has been removed from our side-by-side comparison because it has been discontinued. You can still read our original review below, but Top Ten Reviews is no longer updating this product’s information.

The first thing you'll notice about the Miele C1 Olympus is its size. This lightweight canister vacuum is only 13 pounds, which is lighter than most canister vacuum cleaners in our review. Despite its weight, however, it has a 2-liter canister, which is bigger than much of the competition. This is a good vacuum for carrying up and down stairs, and it fits nicely in a closet.

That's the good news. The bad news is that the Miele is one of the worst vacuums in overall performance. For one thing, the hose is a full foot shorter than those of the best canister vacuums. It may not sound like a big deal, but you'll wish you had more reach, especially in bigger rooms. For our suction test, we measured how much weight the head of each vacuum could pick up. The Miele came in last at only 18 ounces, half the suction of our best lightweight canister vacuums. We spread out kitty litter in a small area to measure its cleaning performance, and the vacuum required 14 passes before the area was clear. This is around 40 percent weaker than other vacuums in the lineup, so you can expect it to take a lot more time to vacuum with it.

The Miele isn't that maneuverable, even with the low weight. For one thing, it isn't self-propelling. This means that you need to push and pull a lot more than you would with other vacuums in the lineup. The head of the vacuum doesn't have true 360-degree rotation, and the power switch isn't conveniently on the handle. You have to kneel down to shut it off. It also isn't a bagless canister vacuum, so you can expect to spend around an extra $70 a year in filters and bags.

For help and support, Miele doesn't provide online chat or a FAQs page, which makes it one of only two canister vacuums we tested without complete support on its website. One plus is that it comes with a five-year warranty, which is the maximum for the vacuums we tested. Still, the website is difficult to navigate, meaning you need extra time and patience if something malfunctions on the vacuum.

The Miele C1 Olympus has a midrange price and a small footprint in your home, but it costs you more than a bagless canister vacuum in the long run. The cleaning performance doesn't justify this extra cost, as this is one of the weaker vacuums we tested.