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Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K TV review

The Vizio M-Series Quantum offers all the HDR, 4K and color rich features of high-end panels, without the steep price.

Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K TV review
(Image: © Vizio)

Our Verdict

The Vizio M-Series Quantum is a 4K and HDR TV that packs in rich colors and features like Google Cast and Apple AirPlay control to make this way more valuable that its price might suggest.

For

  • Great 4K and HDR performance
  • Quantum dot color
  • Local dimming for great blacks

Against

  • Limited app choice

The Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K and HDR 55-inch TV is one of those devices that offers so much at a lower-than-the-competition price, it makes you wonder why you'd go anywhere else. If you're looking for vibrant colors and 4K visuals, but don't want to pay an arm and a leg. then this is the best TV for you.

With quality 4K resolution and great HDR thanks to this screen's quantum dot display, picture performance punches well above the price tag. Smart casting features and free content give this even more bang for your buck.

Of course it'll never look quite as good as high end TVs like the Samsung Q90R, but then it won't cost as much either. But for a mid-range TV from a budget manufacturer this really does perform impressively well. 

Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K TV review: Picture

  • Quantum dot color
  • Full-array local dimming
  • Dolby Vision HDR 4K

The quantum dot display of the M-Series comes packing in 4K resolution but also Dolby Vision, HDR10, and HLG for the best HDR performance. All that with over 600 nits of brightness makes for a solid performance when it comes to picture quality.

VIZIO M-Series Quantum 55 4K TV

(Image credit: VIZIO)
Tech Specs

(Image credit: Samsung)

Average price: $748
Sizes available: 43" - 70"
Screen type: Quantum dot
4K ready? Yes
8K ready? No
HDR type: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG
Audio type: Dolby DTS Studio Sound II
HDMI connections: 4
Other connections: 1 x USB, Optical out, Ethernet, RCA out, Composite.

It's the quantum dot part of this TV that makes it stand out, literally when it comes to color. You get an impressive 99.2 percent of the Rec 709 color space, meaning really lifelike skin tones and super punchy variation between objects on screen. So expect lots of shadow detailing with minimal blooming, making this a great performer for any low light movies.

Of course the full-array local dimming, with 90 zones, also plays a big part here as that allows for far finer control of specific areas of the picture, without haloing or light bleed between dark and light. As such the blacks are rich and textured while the lights are bright and punchy – taking advantage of anything that Dolby Vision feeds from the likes of Netflix or Disney Plus offer this screen.

This applies to gaming too, with 10-bit color and 60Hz support. Although the lag time is 29.9 milliseconds which isn't one of the faster displays out there. That said, for even fast paced movie action, the frames were smooth and clear – impressively so for this price range. But if you want really smooth performance and less lag then the higher end Vizio P-Series Quantum with 120Hz refresh rates might be better suited. 

Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K TV review: Sound

  • Dolby DTS Studio Sound II
  • Lacks bass
  • Dual 20 watt speakers

Sound on a slender TV is rarely something to be impressed by, unless you go for higher end devices like the Sony A9G which uses the screen's glass to cleverly fire out the audio.

Vizio M-Series Quantum

(Image credit: Vizio)

The two 20 watt speakers are never going to pump out that much power. Nor are they going to manage to do the bass of a movie the justice it deserves. But since most speakers on modern TVs are the same, this isn't an area that we take a lot of marks off for. 

For the speakers it offers, this TV delivers an impressive level of loudness with decent levels of separation. Just expect some distortion at higher volumes over 60% and more at the 90% level. Of course you can attach a soundbar or home theater system and you'll get a more powerful and immersive result. So perhaps factor that in on top of the price.

Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K TV review: Design and build

  • Slim bezels
  • Sleek standing legs
  • Great selection of ports

Vizio has stuck with the same design as last year's model, which isn't a bad thing with that very minimal bezel and relatively simple finish. Aside from the Vizio logo in the bottom corner there is very little else to distract you from the screen.

Vizio M-Series Quantum

(Image credit: Vizio)

The stand legs are sleek and good looking though they will require a bit of room to stand up. They stretch out enough to mean you'll need a stand that's at least 12 inches deep to accommodate the TV comfortably. Of course you can also wall mount the TV and still get to all the port easily enough.

From HDMI and USB to optical and composite, there are lot of connection options on this set. The remote control is uniquely designed with a minimal feel and has plenty of dedicated buttons for the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime Video

Onboard is the latest SmartCast 3.0 operating system which now has over 30 apps including most of the big name streaming services. There's also a PlutoTV app that gives you over 100 free TV channels over your internet connection.

Google Chromecast is built-in, there's Apple AirPlay 2 support plus it works with Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant allowing you to use voice controls. 

Should you buy the Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K TV?

If you want to make a saving while still getting a great picture on your TV then the Vizio M-Series Quantum is a superb option. It offers 4K and HDR pictures with excellent full-array local dimming to deliver great contrast and performance. You also get those quantum dots for a wide range of rich and punchy colors.

That 60Hz refresh rate might not be enough for some gamers and the audio definitely needs a soundbar to support it, but at this price that seems like a fair ask.

Other TV reviews: Samsung Q90R review | LG C9 OLED review |  Samsung Q950TS 8K TV review | Sony A9G OLED review | Hisense H9G | TCL 6-Series TV