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CycleOps Wind review

The CycleOps Wind bike trainer is a lightweight design, and provides a simple yet reasonable option for riders who want to spend less for a quality trainer.

CycleOps Wind review
(Image: © CycleOps)

For

  • Lightweight
  • Affordable
  • Simple to use

Against

  • Noisy

The CycleOps Wind is designed primarily to help you continue training during the off-season using your own bike when you're at home. It's both lightweight and simple to use (compared to more feature-rich trainers), and therefore has a lower price tag compared to the top-end models in our best bike trainers guide.

The CycleOps Wind comes with an instructional DVD to help you get the most out of the trainer, and also to introduce you to some exercise techniques you can incorporate into your indoor training. If you're looking to get in further cardio workouts at home and you enjoy cycling, also take a look at our guide to the best exercise bikes

CycleOps Wind review: Design

The CycleOps Wind uses a vortex blade design that utilizes wind to create a range of progressive resistance for a more effective workout, whether you're focused on climbing, sprinting or spinning. The blade doubles as a flywheel too. To get a harder workout, shift your gears, just as you would on the road.

Considering its simple build, the CycleOps Wind is surprisingly diverse, in that it's designed for both road and mountain bike frames. To accommodate these different types of bikes, the bike trainer comes with a quick-release skewer and has three settings for rear dropout spacing.

Those settings measure 120mm, 130mm and 135mm respectively. The resistance roller allows for 650b, 700c, 26-inch, 27-inch and 29-inch wheel sizes.

The CycleOps Wind measures 10.43 x 13.39 x 17.91 inches, and weighs just 18.25lbs, which is considerably less than some of the heavier models we have tested. The frame also folds in half, making it one of the more compact bike trainers around. In fact, it's similar in design to the Bike Lane Pro.

The max user weight is 300lbs, so it should accommodate riders of a wide range of body weights. If you're worried about scuffing up your carpeting or hard flooring in your home gym, CycleOps sells a matching training mat ($79.99).

CycleOps Wind review: The bike trainer shown in black

(Image credit: CycleOps)

CycleOps Wind review: Features

One of our favorite features lis the quick-release lever for super-fast set up, plus easy and folding legs that enable you to pop the trainer away when not in use.

Even though the CycleOps Wind is a simple machine, it's compatible with the brand's VirtualTraining software, which contains various features to help you train and collect data on your work out. This is similar to the Wahoo Kickr, though if you want detailed heart rate and calories burned data, we'd also recommend using one of the best fitness trackers

If you're on the fence about purchasing a wind trainer, keep in mind that CycleOps also backs this bike trainer with a lifetime warranty. Wind trainers are known for being the cheapest progressive resistance machines, in part because there's no need for toggles or handlebar switches since the more you pedal, the more resistance the fan creates. 

Unfortunately, it is possible to max out the resistance on this type of indoor cycle trainer, so if you think you're going to be using a trainer religiously, it might be worth investing in a more robust model such as the Kinetic Road Machine upgraded with a heavier flywheel.

CycleOps Wind review: a detail shot of the bike trainer

(Image credit: CycleOps)

Wind or fan trainers are known for being some of the noisiest in the market; this particular trainer's noise level at 20mph has been measured at 84-86 decibels. In other words, you'll need to wear headphones if you want to listen to music or watch a TV show while you work out.

CycleOps Wind review: User reviews

The CycleOps Wind indoor bike trainer has largely positive customer reviews on Amazon, with users praising its solid build and easy setup. They say it's an ideal choice for off-season training, though it performs best when used with the CycleOps stackable Climbing Block ($29.99) placed underneath the front wheel. 

Less favorable reviews complained that the bike trainer marks hard floorings, so you need to throw down a mat or rug first. Other users said its very noisy, and how the tension wasn't up to scratch.

Overall, user reviews suggest that for the price, this is a decent indoor bike trainer and would make an ideal choice for first-timer buyer's who are curious to see whether a trainer could help them workout using their own bike during the off-season.

Should you buy the CycleOps Wind?

The CycleOps Wind is a sturdy indoor bike trainer made by a trusted manufacturer. It's undeniably noisy when in use, and we would suggest using a training mat beneath it to protect your floors, but for a beginner-level model there's a lot to like here. 

Plus, CycleOps sells plenty of accessories, attachments and roller items to help further optimize and build-out your indoor bike trainer once you become more experienced with using this basic version.