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Liberty Wireless Review

Editor’s Note: This product has been removed from our side-by-side comparison because it has been discontinued.

Our Verdict

Liberty Wireless has the worst phone and plan selection of any provider we've reviewed. You can get more variety for the same price, and better customer service to boot, if you go elsewhere.

For

  • There's no contract or credit check for Liberty Wireless plans, and all three of them come with a free basic phone for new users.

Against

  • Liberty only has one phone it offers users: a simple feature phone with no data connectivity.
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Liberty Wireless image: The provider's home page shows the phone new customers get if they purchase a plan.

Liberty Wireless image: The provider's home page shows the phone new customers get if they purchase a plan.
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Liberty Wireless image: You can check coverage by ZIP code on an embedded map.

Liberty Wireless image: You can check coverage by ZIP code on an embedded map.
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Liberty Wireless image: Be sure to read the terms and conditions, as there is information there about how minutes expire.

Liberty Wireless image: Be sure to read the terms and conditions, as there is information there about how minutes expire.
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Liberty Wireless image: A FAQs page has answers to questions you might have about its plans, though the page has some outdated information.

Liberty Wireless image: A FAQs page has answers to questions you might have about its plans, though the page has some outdated information.

Editor’s Note: This product has been removed from our side-by-side comparison because it has been discontinued. You can still read our original review below, but Top Ten Reviews is no longer updating this product’s information.

Liberty Wireless is a simple cell phone provider with a simple offering: You can buy either a 500-minute time card or a two-week or four-week unlimited talk and text plan, and get a free phone with your order. It seems like a good deal if you don't care what device you get and just want a prepaid phone you can use to make calls. But when you consider how expensive the plans are, you can spend the same amount of money on a different provider and get much more for your dollar.

Liberty has three plans you can pick from. The first is a 500-minute plan that works a lot like a prepaid calling card with an expiration date. You pay $20 for 500 anytime minutes, and these minutes have to be used within 30 days of purchase. If you don't use all your minutes, they expire; if you do and need more, you can buy another 500 minutes, but those new minutes will still expire on the old expiration date. Thus, if you buy 500 minutes and use them up five days before the end of the 30-day cycle, then decide to buy more, you only have five days to use your new minutes. You can avoid this by waiting until the new month to buy more minutes, but you won't be able to use your phone in the meantime.

The unlimited talk and text plans Liberty offers are much more lenient. A $35 plan buys you unlimited minutes and texts for 14 days, while a $50 plan gets you 28 days of use. The two-week plan strikes us as something a covert spy might use for a burn phone – we can't think of many scenarios where someone would need a phone with unlimited minutes for just two weeks. The $50 plan, on the other hand, is close enough to a monthly plan that it might work into your budget. You should be aware, however, that because you'll pay every four weeks rather than every month, you would face 13 pay periods per year instead of 12.

You don't have a choice of devices with Liberty Wireless. Not only is there only one phone listed on its website – an LG Rumor feature phone with a slide-out keyboard – but Liberty won't always send new customers that particular phone. Given that it's free, you may not be concerned about the type of phone you get, but plenty of other prepaid providers offer a selection of discounted or free phones you can choose from, with pricing plans that easily beat Liberty's options.

Liberty Wireless is an aging name among cellular providers, and it has an outdated pricing model to prove it. The company's plans seem designed to confuse and cause losses of the minutes you've paid for if you make a change to your account at the wrong time of the month. Users with particularly basic phone needs might find its service useful, but given that there are other prepaid providers with cheaper plans and better device options, you'll probably be happier elsewhere.